Quick Savings for Homes

An average home spends $100 a year on devices that are off, but still using power. (Hint: Flip the switch off.)
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More Tips for Homes

    • Save on your energy bill by turning up your AC 1-2° — save even more when you use a programmable or Wi-Fi enabled smart thermostat.
      • Every degree above 78 can save you up to 8% on your energy bill.
      • Setting your AC to a very low temperature does not make your house cool down faster. It just wastes energy.
      • Set or program your AC to 80° when you’re gone for more than 4 hours.
      • Set the AC to cool down after 7 p.m.
      • A programmable or smart thermostat can automatically adjust cooling or heating temperatures for optimal performance and savings. A smart thermostat may be adjusted remotely.
    • Use fans. They make a room feel 4-6° cooler.
    • Keep out the sun and hot air.
      • Make sure windows and doors are closed tightly.
      • Close blinds or drapes on windows that get direct sunlight.
      • Shade your outside AC units or condensers.
    • Limit your use of the vent fans above your stove and in your bathroom. They pull in hot outside air, making your AC work harder.
    • Turn down your heat 1-2° or as low as is comfortable — save even more on your energy bill when you use a programmable or smart thermostat.
      • Setting your heat to a very high temperature does not make your house heat up faster. It just wastes energy.
      • Set or program your heat to 55° when you’re gone for more than 4 hours.
      • Turning your thermostat down 7° to 10° for 8 hours a day in the fall or winter, and up in the spring and summer can save you up to 10% per year on your heating and cooling bills.
    • Keep out the cool air and let in the sun.
      • Make sure windows and doors are closed tightly.
      • Open blinds or drapes on windows that get direct sunlight during the day to naturally heat your home. Close them at night to reduce the chill.
      • Keep your fireplace damper closed unless a fire is burning. Keeping it open is like keeping a window open during the winter; warm air goes right up the chimney.
      • If you never use your fireplace, plug and seal the chimney flue.
      • If you do use the fireplace, install tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system that blows warmed air back into the room and lower your thermostat setting to between 50° and 55°F.
    • Set your water heater temperature to 120°F.
    • Consult the Energy label prior to purchasing appliances to get information on energy consumption and how much energy the appliance uses in comparison to similar models.
    • Keep your refrigerator and freezer full, even if you just use bottles of water. A full fridge uses less energy.
    • Minimize opening and closing your refrigerator and freezer. Each time you open them, warm air rushes in causing appliances to work harder and use more energy.
    • When you purchase a new, more energy-efficient refrigerator, consider recycling your old refrigerator. Storing your old refrigerator in a garage or other non-air conditioned space can damage the refrigerator and make it work much harder, costing you more money.
    • Make sure the seals on your refrigerator and freezer are airtight.
    • Keep the condenser coils on your refrigerator and freezer clean.
    • Save money by letting the Texas heat dry your clothes.
      • Use a clothesline or drying rack instead of the dryer.
      • If your clothes dry a little stiff, use your dryer’s “fluff” cycle (before 3 or after 7 p.m.).
    • Run washers, dryers, and dishwashers only when fully loaded.
    • Use the air-dry setting on your dishwasher. The heat-dry setting uses more energy. It also heats up your home, which means more AC.
    • Wash your laundry with cold water.
    • Don’t overfill your dryer.
      • Dry your laundry loads back-to-back and clean the lint filter between loads. This way, your dryer is still hot from the previous load, and you save energy.
    • Unplug TVs and other equipment when you leave a room. Use power strips to make this easy. Many electronics continue to use power even when they are switched off which can add 10% to your monthly utility bill.
    • Use the "home" or "standard" setting on your TV to reduce the TV's energy usage by 18% to 30%.
    • Unplug your phone charger and similar devices when charging is complete.
    • Use ENERGY STAR set-top boxes which are 40% more efficient than conventional models.
    • Stream content on the smallest device that makes sense for the number of people watching.
      • Watch out for video game consoles. They can be energy hogs! Streaming on your video game console can use 10 times more power than streaming through a tablet or laptop.
    • Replace traditional incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) or ENERGY STAR certified LED (light-emitting diode) lightbulbs. An ENERGY STAR certified LED lightbulb uses up to 90% less energy than old incandescent bulbs and can save you more than $80 in electriciy costs over its lifetime.
    • ENERGY STAR certified light fixtures use 70%-90% less energy, produce about 70% less heat than traditional models using incandescent light bulbs, and last about 15-25 times longer
    • Using a small light when reading is more efficient than brightly lighting an entire room.
    • Keep your light bulbs clean and free from dust.
    • Use LED holiday light strings to reduce the cost of decorating your home for the winter holidays.
    • Turn off lights when not in use.